Saturday, August 30, 2014

New content, new contributors


Eric Raymond popularized the phrase "release early, release often" as a philosophy for software development. It works for digital scholarhip, too.

We're happy to announce today an early release of a facsimile browser incorporating new material from our photography in the Escorial last summer. The digital facsimile edition requires data about the manuscripts (including what folios appear in what sequence), an index aligning each folio with a canonical citation of lines of the Iliad, and an index identifying which side of which folio each image illustrates. A group of dedicated and talented volunteers (some shown in the photo) has been meeting regularly on Friday afternoons to put this material together for the E3 manuscript, prior to beginning work on a full diplomatic edition of the text (as others are already doing for the Venetus A and Venetus B codices).

Perhaps even more remarkable than the volunteers' rapid mastery of E3's Byzantine script is the fact that all of the students are in their first year of Greek. If you're not accustomed to learning about the transmission of Homer from first-year Greek students, a Friday afternoon with this group is enlightening.



You will undoubtedly see postings on this blog in the future announcing further releases of material from "Team E3." In addition to the puzzles they've had to solve to make today's release available, they are compiling careful observations that will lead to a helpful guide to the paleography of E3, and have already noted a number of unpublished or unappreciated discrepancies bewteen E3 and other manuscripts that are forcing all of us working on the Homer Multitext project to reassess entirely the traditional scholarly views on the (b) family of manuscripts of the Iliad.

The E3 group has currently indexed more than half of the manuscript: we're including folios 1 recto - 109 recto (covering Iliad books 1-8) in today's release.

Our profound thanks to all members of the group (alphabetically):

  • Matthew Angiolillo
  • Neil Curran
  • Maria Jaroszewicz
  • Alex Krasowski
  • Becky Musgrave
  • Kathleen O'Connor
  • Anne Salloom
  • Megan Whitacre


Monday, August 11, 2014

New publication of Homer Multitext research

If you would like to know what kind of research is being enabled by the Homer Multitext project, check out the recent publication in the Sunoikisis Undergraduate Research Journal of work by Matthew Angiollilo, Thomas Arralde, Melissa Browne, Nik Churik, Brian Clark, Stephanie Lindeborg, Rebecca Musgrave, and Neel Smith, in which the construction, organization, and layout of three Byzantine manuscripts of the Iliad are discussed. 

Friday, August 1, 2014

First publication of software for HMT services

In February, we announced the first publication of the HMT project’s archival data. Today, we are releasing the first published version of hmt-digital, a java servlet providing digital services for working with the project archive.

Version 1.0 is now installed at http://www.homermultitext.org/hmt-digital, where you can routinely expect to find the currently published services using the currently published version of the data archive. We continue to run a test site at http://beta.hpcc.uh.edu/tomcat/hmt-digital/. The test set normally runs in-progress versions of hmt-digital, and uses unpublished versions of our data archive.

Our software, like all the data in our archive, is openly licensed. If you’d prefer to run a local installation of the hmt-digital services, you’ll find instructions on the README for the project’s github repository.

Links


Saturday, July 26, 2014

The traditional Trojan assembly

Over on our companion Oral Poetry blog, I continue my series on the Trojan catalogue in conjunction with and parallel to Casey’s blogging of the Catalogue of Ships. In my first post I looked at how the Trojans are introduced in our Iliad and how to understand some of the traditional language used. In my second post I continue looking at Iris's message to the Trojan assembly and how its use of traditional language both sets the “now” of the story into action and simultaneously evokes earlier episodes of the war.
Iris

Friday, July 25, 2014

It's National Sysadmin Day

Followers of the Homer Multitext blog may not immediately identify the last Friday in July as National Sysadmin Day, but we're acutely aware of our debt to the administrators who keep all the systems we depend on running smoothly.  I would especially like to acknowledge the support we have received from Alan Pfeiffer-Traum at the University of Houston.  Without Alan's work, I doubt we could be serving the thousands of on-line images of manuscripts you can browse today from the HMT project.

Thanks to the sysadmins at every site where Homer Multitext teams are working!


Monday, June 30, 2014

Seminar 2014 Presentations

We have reached the time for CHS Summer Seminar 2014 presentations! We are looking forward to our participants presenting on a variety of topics seen in the scholia of Iliad 12. We will be live streaming the presentations. If you would like to watch the presentations live see the following instructions and caveats:

The best place to see the stream is on the CHS network.

If you are not able to come to the CHS, you can try the following link: rtsp://stream.chs.harvard.edu/HouseA.

Note that Mac users will have to use QuickTime 7 Player  (a very old version) because Apple has deleted RTSP format from QuickTime 10: http://support.apple.com/kb/dl923.

The VLC player works too, sometimes: http://www.videolan.org/.

If you have any trouble accessing the stream, but would like to watch the presentations, they will be recorded and posted at a later date.

Stay tuned for more blog posts based on the Summer 2014 presentations and on other work by our participants.

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Iliad 12 as Oral Traditional Poetry



Each year at the Homer Multitext Summer Seminar we introduce a new group of students to the scholarly principles that underlie the Homer Multitext project, which are grounded in the research and fieldwork of Milman Parry and Albert Lord on oral poetry. In addition to talking in a broad way about how the Iliad was composed and transmitted over time, we also think out loud about how our understanding of Homeric poetry as an oral traditional system affects how we interpret the poetry. And each year we ground that discussion by focusing on a particular book of the Iliad. The students create an XML edition of the text and scholia for that book in the Venetus A manuscript, and in a series of sessions we talk as a group about the poetics of that book. This year's book is Iliad 12 and it has led us to discuss such topics as the building of and battle before the Achaean wall (which caused such consternation among Analyst scholars in the 19th and early 20th centuries), the poetics of battle and the way that they overlap with the poetics of Catalogue poetry such as we find in Iliad 2, and the way that repetition functions in oral poetry, as well as text critical questions such as how to treat verses that are omitted from one or more of our medieval manuscripts (such as 12.219). These discussions have fostered a great deal of creative exchange among the participating students and faculty (who this year include Michiel Cock, Casey Dué, Eric Dugdale, Mary Ebbott, Olga Levaniouk, Gregory Nagy, Corinne Pache, Ineke Sluiter, and Neel Smith). This exchange has in turn influenced the latest post on our Oral Poetry blog, "Walk On Characters in the Iliad."